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Ohio medical examiner rejects death certificate for woman who died in Cincinnati hotel

Ohio medical examiner rejects death certificate for woman who died in Cincinnati hotel

CINCINNATI — A Cincinnati medical examiner rejected a death certificate Wednesday that said the 28-year-old woman who had died in a hotel room in August 2014 died of a brain aneurysm, an unusual diagnosis in a case that drew international attention and drew sharp criticism from her family.

In rejecting the death certificate, Cincinnati Medical Examiner Edmond Aguilar said the patient’s family members were unable to meet the legal requirements to obtain an autopsy, which he said was necessary for the medical examiner to consider the cause of death.

The family said in a statement that the woman, whose name was not released, died of cerebral aneurism, a condition that results from swelling in the brain caused by a blood clot or blood clotting disorder.

Aguilar said he had asked the family for more time to review the autopsy and to review documents.”

We are currently working with our legal team to determine what additional steps may be necessary.”

Aguilar said he had asked the family for more time to review the autopsy and to review documents.

Aguiler said he would consider any additional requests that come his way.

He said he was reviewing the autopsy report, which is still being reviewed, and the family’s other documents.

“I don’t want to be an impediment to their grieving process,” Aguilar told the Journal-News on Thursday.

In his letter to Aguilar, the family said they had been told the patient had suffered from a seizure disorder, and that the hospital had not made a determination whether the patient was intoxicated or had an alcohol problem.

They also said they did not have enough evidence to determine whether the woman’s death was due to heart disease or diabetes.

The woman’s family, which had asked for an autopsy and other medical records to be released, said in their statement that Aguiler had asked that the medical examiners release the autopsy results for a week to determine if they could “examine the underlying cause of the death.”

“The medical examiner should have been granted access to these documents,” the family wrote.

“This request is not reasonable and does not reflect an open and fair discussion of the issues involved.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.