Introduction
U.S. food stamps recipients say they are living paycheck to paycheck, but they’re not going hungry

U.S. food stamps recipients say they are living paycheck to paycheck, but they’re not going hungry

Posted October 16, 2018 07:01:00 While many of the more than 2 million people receiving food stamps are in the bottom third of the income distribution, they say they’re living paycheck-to-paycheck and not struggling financially.

Some are raising families, and are spending less on food than they have in years.

But they’re also worried about the future and worried about how they will pay for it, and how long it will take to save for retirement.

“I think the food stamp program is very important.

I think it’s a big step for the economy.

And I think that if we can just do it as well as we possibly can, and we don’t have to work for it,” said Adnan Sami, the food-stamp coordinator for the Florida Department of Children and Families.

“We’re still getting more people into poverty. “

When we look at it as a whole, we’re actually not getting much better,” he said.

“We’re still getting more people into poverty.

And we’re still going to have people who are on food stamps who are living in poverty.”

The food stamp population has been growing since 2008, when the economy boomed.

About 3.5 million people were eligible for food stamps in 2014, up from 1.6 million in 2007, according to the U.N. Department of Economic and Social Affairs.

That number is expected to grow another 1.2 million in 2020, when an expansion of the Earned Income Tax Credit is due to start.

“What we need to do is try to reduce the amount of food that’s being sent to people who can’t eat, who are in dire situations and need help,” said Paul Ragan, an economist with the nonpartisan Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

The federal government spends $11.2 billion a year on food assistance, including $3.9 billion for food stamp recipients, according the U